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LIGHTING LANDSCAPES

BUY YOUR COPY NOW.


The ILP guide Lighting Landscapes is now launched and available to purchase.There are already many endorsements of this beautifully illustrated publication including:

'A very valuable practical guide and sourcebook, not only simplifying the technical aspects of integrating lighting schemes into the public realm, but illustrating the great potential and value they add. Recommended for clients seeking to improve their understanding of the important role high quality lighting plays in improving our built environments' - Niall Tipping, Senior Development Manager, Grosvenor Estates.

 

'Lighting Landscapes covers all aspects of this tricky area of lighting design. The book covers the lighting design process clearly and describes a range of schemes. Lighting is visual and is hard to explain, this book succeeds in explaining the process and the results very clearly. This is an excellent book.'Mark Sutton Vane, Lighting Designer.

 

'This excellent book, generously furnished with beautiful photographs, puts forward a very persuasive argument for employing a lighting designer as part of the design team on a public realm project. I absolutely agree. As a landscape architect I have experienced both ends of the ‘lighting’ spectrum, seeing schemes lit by – at the one extreme – the landscape architect (all “creative intuition” but little technical understanding) and – at the other – the engineer (with comprehensive technical knowledge but not necessarily much in the way of creativity).' - Carolyn Willitts, Landscape Architect.


'Lighting Landscapes’ demonstrates  a breadth and scope of research which makes this a very useful resource for client or practitioner alike. The complex balance between the art and science of lighting is clearly explained with technical issues, procurement methods, ideas and case studies well presented. With most of the examples based in the UK, it is also a celebration of the last 5 years’ progressive and adventurously lit landscapes.'' - Lindsey Whitelaw, Landscape Architect.

  

'Lighting Landscapes published by the ILP provides an excellent reference source and guidance on how lighting design should be incorporated in the public realm. In addition to clear information on the design process the projects and illustrations are truly inspirational. The design and layout of the book are exceptionally good and it is certainly something that deserves pride of place on the coffee table rather than being hidden away in the technical library.'Kevan Shaw, Lighting Designer.


WHO IS THE GUIDE FOR?

• Landscape Architects • Planning Authorities • Lighting Engineers
• Elected Members of Local Authorities • Public Consultation • Architects • Contractors
• Students of design, architecture and engineering • Prospective clients • Other Bodies
• Lighting Designers


The guide has a three-part structure, offering answers to the following key questions:

Section 1: Why use lighting in landscape projects? What are the main benefits in aesthetic, social and commercial/economic terms?

Section 2: How do you employ and commission lighting design in landscape projects to achieve these long-term benefits?

Section 3: What is best practice in landscape lighting – and what are the finest results that we have witnessed, drawn from the UK and elsewhere?

 

Buy your copy now.


Please click on the questions below to view Carl Gardner and Mark Ridler's answers about the upcoming guide (you will be redirected to YouTube):

Certain members of the landscape profession may argue that natural features of landscape shouldn't be spoiled by modern lighting or that such lighting is wasteful energy.

The book talks about helping 'create a distinctive identity or image for a town, city or area of a city' (P13). Can it really make a difference and are there any great examples maybe in the book to illustrate it?

The social benefits of crime deterrence through lighting are probably underestimated (P14 & P15) especially as it's understood that by 2020, 70% of us will be living in cities. Is this an area clients and planners are fully conversant with?

The book has already received positive feedback from some landscape architect quarters. Does the lighting profession do enough to engage with architects on lighting education?

Less is more. The guide provides some inspiring examples of landscape lighting projects. Let's discuss a few of these and how some have used discreet design to transform the surroundings.